The Idea

Sections (TOC) :

• English -- Images Only
      307 Words; 4,026 Characters

• English Text
      1,948 Words; 13,623 Characters

• German Text
      2,098 Words; 15,033 Characters

• Original, German Scans
      307 Words; 4,026 Characters

Sections (Content) :

• English -- Images Only

2020 Preface

The Masereel Group is devoted to spreading the public domain works of this great artist. The text was first acquired and then scanned. Then it was cropped, rotated, balanced, contrasted, saturated, despeckled, noise-reductioned, and some manually touched up. This was followed by OCR scanning, manual proofreading, and translating into English.

This book is in the public domain in the United States (because it was published before 1925), but it is not public domain in Europe (because its author died in 1972). But the Masereel Group is based in the United States, so everything within here is released under the Public Domain, and all content that is not allowed to be licensed under the Public Domain is released under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 3.0 License.

UprisingEngineer, Masereel Group,
August 30, 2020

• English Text

2020 Preface

The Masereel Group is devoted to spreading the public domain works of this great artist. The text was first acquired and then scanned. Then it was cropped, rotated, balanced, contrasted, saturated, despeckled, noise-reductioned, and some manually touched up. This was followed by OCR scanning, manual proofreading, and translating into English.

This book is in the public domain in the United States (because it was published before 1925), but it is not public domain in Europe (because its author died in 1972). But the Masereel Group is based in the United States, so everything within here is released under the Public Domain, and all content that is not allowed to be licensed under the Public Domain is released under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 3.0 License.

UprisingEngineer, Masereel Group,
August 30, 2020

The Idea
83 Woodcuts
From
Frans Masereel

Introduction by Hermann Hesse


Kurt Wolff Verlag / Munich

5. -- 9. Thousand

Printed in 1928 by Offizin Haag-Drugulin, A.-G. in Leipzig / Cover drawing by Emil Preetorius / Copyright 1927 by Kurt Wolff Verlag A. G., Munich / Printed in Germany

INTRODUCTION

"La passion d'un homme", "The Path of Sorrows", was the title of the first series of woodcuts by Frans Masereel, which I saw years ago in brotherhood counts, although I have never met him personally, and although he is actually not close to me in terms of type and origin, but rather is my antipode.

“Man's Path of Sorrows” could be the title of the whole work of this wonderful, fanatical, childlike, refined artist, and this already means that Masereel has been at the center of all art from the very beginning. Because man's path of suffering, the passion of the Incarnation, the painful being on this difficult path, the thousand upsurges, a thousand bitter relapses - this passion story is the only and eternal content of all art.

This very modern artist Masereel, this real big city dweller, this curious, slightly enthusiastic, always hungry, always receptive child person, who so often has to do with factories and cars, with flywheels and pipes, skyscrapers and urban street traffic, who has the distorted face of the usurer Having portrayed the raw of the policeman, the stupid of the whore, the evil of the exploiter a hundred and a thousand times as timely, he is basically always occupied with something thoroughly timeless and eternal: with the eternally identical, eternally compassionate, eternally inspiring human history. How this two-legged, talented, evil, dangerous, cowardly cattle can become that other person whom the religions and great cultures mean, the person of the idea, the person in the service of God, the person of love, self-conquest and goodness - these ancient, serious, happy, holy story, about which the Bibles of all peoples and ages deal, this Bethlehem, Jerusalem and Golgotha ​​of the developing, the aspiring human is the content of Masereel's art, over and over again. He does not speak of Moses and the kings, not of the prophets and not of the Savior, he speaks of himself and of us, his brothers, he speaks of the people of our time, as he is in the midst of his cities, his machines, his armies and Barracks, his factories and penitentiaries are looking for their way, the longing for God in their hearts, sometimes attracted and bound by the world with all the loveliest charms of love, sometimes deeply offended and disappointed, involved in a hundred battles, hero and fool of an eternal ideal. Masereel has portrayed this person many times, always it is himself. Several times he has let him die, he has placed him against a wall in front of the soldiers' shotguns and had him shot, often he has visibly perished in a hopeless fight with them much stronger world, with these barracks, these judges, these newspaper and factory people, these wooers, these ruffians and connoisseurs. But again and again he gets up, again and again he begins his beautiful and difficult path, again and again he falls from the sky with broken wings, only to swing himself out of the gloomy chamber window of everyday life in enthusiastic hours. And all these fights - that's the wonderful thing! - Not a preacher, not an angry prophet, not an accusing judge, not a malicious satirist, but a lover experiences all these battles, these sufferings, these wanderings and agony of death. Something of that which makes him so drunk and enthusiastic and that inspires his flight so ravishingly, something of this distant, divine, blissfully anticipated, fervently sought, what he finds in sun and sea, in flowers and animals, in beautiful bodies and in beautiful pious ones Worshiping gestures and seeking out again and again, something of the ray of this divine is also in his factories, his night clubs, his prostitutes, his courtrooms, his distorted egoist faces. On many of his papers, where the hero falls into the hands of the Philistines and is stoned by the mob or rolled to death by the ice-cold justice machine of the state, the bearers of the brute force may have really angry, really wild, raw, beastly faces, but their grins reveals infinite agony - they too go a difficult path, a path of suffering, the wicked, the violent criminals, the lost brothers who want to kill the living and eternal in themselves as they kill it in the persecuted hero. They too suffer, these brutal violent people, they too are on their way on a difficult, arduous path, lost people, plagued by fearful dreams, convulsively doing stupid and wrong things. They too suffer, they too are people, are brothers. As much as he seems to simplify with his rapid wood-cutting technique, the artist loves to pursue the characteristic expression, the characteristic gesture of his villains and evildoers too, he studies the elegant top hat, the grimace of the policeman snarling, the crease of the industrialist's trousers with the the same love, the same devotion, curiosity and burning artist obsession as he studies the shimmer of a naked body, the smile of a child.

In the woodcut series “The Idea” Masereel found one of his most delightful symbols. There he sits at the table, the dear fellow, coaxed, pensive, concentrated, waiting for the spark. And the spark comes and ignites, from the artist's head the idea jumps brightly and easily, a small, lovely girl figure, a shimmering, naked little Undine, whom he greets with delight and gratefulness, presses to his heart, adores, kisses full of love. But then the holy hour is already over, the idea must go, it must go out into the world, to the others. Sadly, he says goodbye to her, sadly he sees her making her way. She no longer belongs to him, the dear little one, she has flown away and is now going towards the world, towards her mission. It is received with curiosity, with joy, in the midst of a swarm of people who are ready to grab it, exploit it, and sell it on. She, the naked, beautiful fairy tale child, is quickly put into everyday clothes, she wears her clothes sadly through the streets, rushes from them furiously, races and dances naked and radiant through the world, is gazed at by the people, suspected by the Philistines, denounced by morality , taken away by the police, locked up, dressed in new clothes. She finds her father and hero again, who receives her blissfully, who is persecuted because of her, is captured, is led to death - but she is always with him, makes suffering a joy, and when he is shot and dies for his idea should, she places herself between him and death, but has to see him die and help bury. She walks on through the world, the dear little fairy, she enchants and frightens people, is coveted and persecuted by them, she takes refuge in a print shop, is reproduced, flies a hundredfold, comes into a thousand hands, in front of a thousand eyes, excited love and contempt, admiration and scandal - how happy and easy it swings up on the paper where it leaves the press! It is pursued again, is burned, but while the burners glee into the ashes, it is already floating away high in the air, conquering the wire, the telephone, the train, the Morse set, the photographer and film superior and mermaid with the whole complicated apparatus of our mechanics, gets everything excited, confuses everything, spreads seeds of unrest, of life, of love, of indignation, and in the end, after eighty adventures, finds his way back to him, to hers Father and lover. He's sitting and has just given birth to a new, beautiful idea - but wasn't he shot dead? to bury? No, he's been living again a long time ago, maybe since then he has died many deaths, gone through many Gethsemans. She floats in to him and sees him sadly obsessed with the new idea, in love with his new sister, but she too is not allowed to stay with him, she too has to go out and begin her passionate journey. Thus the ring closes, the Creator remains lonely.

I would like to wish that this idea will make this little, radiant sorceress, quite a lot in love with herself, enchant quite a lot and fill it with a longing for their homeland, our homeland. It is a spark from beyond, a tender call from the higher world, a tender reminder of our goal and our task, of the path of incarnation that lies ahead of us. We don't want to smile at her or pursue her, this beautiful girl from abroad, we neither want to pursue her, nor burn her, nor drag her down and turn her into a whore. She is our dear little sister, a greeting from our distant home.

The man who wrote this wonderful little picture story, and many others, is a Belgian, and one day during the war he appeared in Switzerland, not to cry out for revenge for his fatherland, but for the war itself to explain. Day after day, joy and consolation for a loyal little group of like-minded people, Masereel's woodcuts against the war, a new sheet every day. The rest of us were all very busy at the time, we had to shoot or guard prisoners, or bandage wounds or invent new substitutes. But when I think back to that fantastic time, it seems to me that Masereel was actually the only one who did something sensible, something good and worthy of gratitude every day. I would like to take this late opportunity to thank him for this.

Hermann Hesse

DOCTOR LOUIS LAVA

APPROPRIATE

• German Text

2020 Preface

The Masereel Group is devoted to spreading the public domain works of this great artist. The text was first acquired and then scanned. Then it was cropped, rotated, balanced, contrasted, saturated, despeckled, noise-reductioned, and some manually touched up. This was followed by OCR scanning, manual proofreading, and translating into English.

This book is in the public domain in the United States (because it was published before 1925), but it is not public domain in Europe (because its author died in 1972). But the Masereel Group is based in the United States, so everything within here is released under the Public Domain, and all content that is not allowed to be licensed under the Public Domain is released under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 3.0 License.

UprisingEngineer, Masereel Group,
August 30, 2020

Die Idee
83 Holzschnitte
von
Frans Masereel

Einleitung von Hermann Hesse


Kurt Wolff Verlag / Munchen

5. -- 9. Tausend

Gedruckt im Jahre 1928 von der Offizin Haag-Drugulin, A.-G. in Leipzig / Einbandzeichnung von Emil Preetorius / Copyright 1927 by Kurt Wolff Verlag A. G., München / Printed in Germany

EINLEITUNG

La passion d'un h0mme“, ,Der Leidensweg eines Menschen', so hieß der Titel der ersten Holzschnittfolge von Frans Masereel, die ich vor Jahren zu Gesicht bekamseit damals gehört Masereel zu den Kameraden auf Erden, die ich liebe und verehre und mit zur inneren Bruderschaft zähle, obwohl ich ihm nie persönlich begegnet bin, und obwohl er von Art und Herkunft mir eigentlich gar nicht nahe steht, sondern eher mein Antipode ist.

,,Leidensweg des Menschen“ so könnte als Titel über dem ganzen Werk dieses herrlichen, fanatischen, kindlichen, raffinierten Künstlers stehen, und schon damit ist gesagt, daß Masereel von allem Anfang an schon mitten im Zentrum aller Kunst steht. Denn der Leidensweg des Menschen, die Passion der Menschwerdung, das schmerzliche Unterwegssein auf diesem schweren Wege, die tausend Aufschwünge, tausend bitteren Rückfälle -- diese Passionsgeschichte ist der einzige und ewige Inhalt aller Kunst.

Dieser so moderne Künstler Masereel, dieser echte Großstädter, dieser neugierige, leicht begeisterte, immer hungrige, immer aufnahmehereite Kindermensch, der es so häufigmit Fabriken und Autos, mit Schwungrädern und Leitungen, Wolkenkratzern und großstädtischem Straßenbetrieb zu tun hat, der das verzerrte Gesicht des Wucherers, das rohe des Polizisten, das dumme der Huer, das böse des Ausbeuters hundert- und tausendmal so sehrzeitgemäß dargestellt hat, erist im Grunde immer mit etwas durchaus Zeitlosem und Ewigem beschäftigt: mit der ewig gleichen, ewigleidvollen, ewigbegeisternden Geschichte des Menschen. Wie aus diesem zweibeinigen, begabten, bösen, gefährlichen, feigen Vieh Mensch jener andere Mensch werden kann, den die Religionen und die großen Kulturen meinen, der Mensch der Idee, der Mensch im Dienste Gottes, der Mensch der Liebe, Selbstüberwindung und Güte - diese uralte, ernste, frohe, heilige Geschichte, von der die Bibeln aller Völker und Zeitalter handeln, dies Bethlehem, Jerusalem und Golgatha des Werdenden, des strebenden Menschen ist der Inhalt von Masereels Kunst, immer und immer wieder. Er redet nicht von Moses und von den Königen, nicht von den Propheten und nicht vom Heiland, er spricht von sich selber und von uns, seinen Brüdern, er spricht vom Menschen unserer Zeit, wie er inmitten seiner Städte, seiner Maschinen, seiner Heere und Kasernen, seiner F abriken und Zuchthäuser seinen Weg sucht, die Sehnsucht nach Gott im Herzen, von der Welt bald mit allem holdesten Liebesreiz angezogen und gefesselt, bald tief beleidigt und enttäuscht, in hundert Kämpfe verwickelt, Held und Narr eines ewigen Ideals. Viele Male hat Masereel diesen Menschen dargestellt, immer ist es er selbst. Mehrere Male schon hater ihn sterben lassen, hat er ihn an eine Mauer vor die Flinten der Soldaten gestellt und erschießen lassen, oft schon ist er seheinbar untergegangen im hoffnungslosen Kampf mit dieser so viel stärkeren Welt, mit diesen Kasernen, diesen Richtern, diesen Zeitungsund Fabrikmenschen, diesen Wueherern, diesen Raffern und Genießern. Aber immer wieder steht er auf, immer wieder beginnt er seinen schönen und schweren Weg, immer wieder stürzt er mit gebrochenen Flügeln vom Himmel, um sich immer Wieder in begeisterter Stunde aus dem trüben Kammerfenster des Alltags zu schwingen. Und alle diese Kämpfe - das ist das Wunderbare! - alle diese Kämpfe, diese Leiden, diese Irrfahrten und Todesqualen erlebt nicht ein Prediger, nicht ein zorniger Prophet, nicht ein anklagender Richter, nicht ein boshafter Satiriker, sondern ein Liebender. Etwas von dem, was ihn so trunken und begeistert macht und seinen Flug so hinreißend beflügelt, etwas von diesem Fernen, Göttlichen, selig Geahnten, inbrünstig Gesuchten, was er in Sonne und Meer, in Blume und Tier, in schönen Leibern und in schönen frommen Gebärden anbetet und immer wieder aufsucht, etwas vom Strahl dieses Göttlichen ist auch in seinen Fabriken, seinen Nachtlokalen, seinen Dirnenstuhen, seinen Gerichtssälen, seinen verzerrten Egoistengesichtern. Auf vielen seiner Blätter, wo der Held in die Hand der Philister fällt und vom Pöbel gesteinigt oder von der eiskalten Gerechtigkeitsmaschine des Staates totgewalzt wird, da haben zwar die Träger der rohen Gewalt recht böse, recht wüste, rohe, viehische Gesichter, aber ihr Grinsen verrät unendliche Qual -- einen schweren Weg, einen Leidensweg gehen auch sie, die Bösen, die Gewalttäter, die verirrten Brüder, die das Lebendige und Ewige in sich töten wollen, wie sie es im verfolgten Helden totschlagen. Auch sie leiden, diese rohen Gewaltmenschen, auch sie sind unterwegs auf einem schweren, mühsamen Weg, Verirrte, von Angsttrãumen Geplagte, krampfhaft das Dumme und Falsche Tuende. Auch sie leiden, auch sie sind Menschen, sind Brüder. Mit Liebe geht der Künstler, so sehr er mit seinerraschen Holzschneide-Technikzu vereinfachen scheint, auch bei seinen Bösewichtern und Ubeltätern den charakteristischen Ausdruck, derbezeichnenden Gebärde nach, er studiert den Zylinder des Elegants, die Fratze des anschnauzenden Polizisten, die Hosenfalte des Großindustriellen mit der selben Liebe, der selben Hingabe, Neugierde und brennenden Künstler-Besessenheit, wie er den Schimmer eines nackten Körpers, das Lächeln eines Kindes studiert.

In der Holzschnittfolge ,,Die Idee“ hat Masereel eines seiner entzückendsten Symbole gefunden. Da sitzt er am Tisch, der liebe Kerl, eingesponnen, sinnend, konzentriert, auf den Funken wartend. Und der Funke kommt und zündet, aus des Künstlers Haupt springt hell und leicht die Idee, eine kleine, holde Mädchenfigur, eine schimmernde, nackte kleine Undine, die er entzückt und dankbar begrüßt, ans Herz drückt, anbetet, voll Verliebtheit küßt. Dann aber ist die heilige Stunde schon herum, die Idee muß fort, sie muß in die Welt hinaus, zu den Andern. Traurig nimmt er von ihr Abschied, bekümmert sieht er sie ihren Weg antreten. Sie gehört nicht mehr ihm, die liebe Kleine, sie ist fortgeflogen und geht nun der Welt entgegen, ihrer Mission entgegen. Mit Neugierde, mit Freude wird sie empfangen, mitten unter einem Schwarm von Menschen, die bereit sind, sie zu packen, auszubeuten, weiterzuverschachern. Man steckt sie, das nackte, schöne Märchenkind, schnell in Allerweltskleider, traurig trägt sie die Kleider durch die Gassen, entspringt ihnen rasend, rast und tanzt nackt und strahlend durch die Welt, wird vom Volk begafft, vom Philister beargwöhnt, von der Moral denunziert, von der Polizei abgeführt, eingesperrt, neu eingekleidet. Sie findet ihren Vater und Helden wieder, der sie selig empfängt, der ihretwegen verfolgt wird, gefangen wird, zum Tode geführt wird -- aber stets ist sie bei ihm, macht das Leid zur Freude, und als er erschossen werden und für seine Idee sterben soll, stellt sie sich zwischen ihn und den Tod, muß ihn aber doch sterben sehen und begraben helfen. Sie läuft weiter durch die Welt, die liebe kleine Fee, sie entzückt und erschreckt die Menschen, wird von ihnen begehrt und verfolgt, sie flüchtet in eine Druckerei, wird vervielfältigt, fliegt verhundertfacht weiter, kommt in tausend Hände, vor tausend Augen, erregt Liebe und Verachtung, Verehrung und Ärgernis - wie schwingt sie sich froh und leicht empor auf dem Blatt, wo sie die Presse verläßt! - Wieder wird sie verfolgt, wird verbrannt, aber während die Verbrenner frohlockend in die Asche stieren, schwebt sie schon wieder hoch in den Lüften davon, erobert den Draht, das Telephon, die Bahn, den Morse-Apparat, den Photographen und Film, spielt überlegen und nixenhaft mit dem ganzen komplizierten Apparat unserer Mechanik, bringt alles in Erregung, bringt alles durcheinander, streut eine Saat von Unruhe, von Leben, von Liebe, von Empörung, und findet am Ende, nach achtzig Abenteuern, zu Ihm zurück, zu ihrem Vater und Geliebten. Der sitzt und hat soeben ein neue, schöne Idee geboren - aber war er denn nicht totgeschossen? begraben? Nein, er lebt längst wieder, vielleicht ist er seither schon manchen Tod gestorben, durch manches Gethsemane gegangen. Sie schwebt zu ihm herein und sieht ihn traurig von der neuen Idee besessen, in die neue Schwester verliebt, aber a uch die darf nicht bei ihm bleiben, auch sie muß hinaus und ihren Passionsweg an treten. So schließt sich der Ring, einsam bleibt der Schöpfer zurück.

Ich möchte Wohl Wünschen, daß diese Idee diese kleine, strahlende Zauberin, recht Viele in sich verliebt mache, recht Viele bezaubere und mit Sehnsucht nach ihrer Heimat, unserer aller Heimat, erfülle. Sie ist ein Funke von jenseits, ein zarter Ruf aus der höheren Welt, eine zarte Mahnung an unser Ziel und unsere Aufgabe, an den Weg der Menschwerdung, der vor uns liegt. Wir wollen sie nicht belächeln und nicht verfolgen, dieses schöne Mädchen aus der Fremde, wir wollen sie Weder verfolgen noch verbrennen, noch herabziehen und zur Huer machen. Sie ist unsere liebe kleine Schwester, ist ein Gruß aus unserer fernen Heimat.

Der Mann, der diese wunderbare kleine Bildergeschichte, und noch manch andere, gedichtet hat, ist ein Belgier, und während des Krieges erschien er eines Tages in der Schweiz, nicht um nach Rache für sein Vaterland zu schreien, sondern um dem Kriege selbst den Krieg zu erkläern. Tag für Tag erschienen damals, Freude und Trost für eine treue kleine Schar von Gesinnungsgenossen, Masereels Holzschnitte gegen den Krieg, jeden Tag ein neues Blatt. Wir andern waren damals ja alle sehr beschäftigt, wir mußten schießen oder Gefangene bewachen, oder Wunden verbinden oder neue Ersatzmittel erfinden. Aber wenn ich jetzt an jene phantastische Zeit zurück denke, so scheint mir eigentlich Masereel der Einzige gewesen zu sein, der damals Tag für Tag etwas Vernünftiges, etwas Gutes und Dankeswertes getan hat. Dafür möchte ich ihm bei dieser späten Gelegenheit meinen Dank ahstatten.

Hermann Hesse

DOKTOR LOUIS LAVA

ZUGEEIGNET

• Original, German Scans

2020 Preface

The Masereel Group is devoted to spreading the public domain works of this great artist. The text was first acquired and then scanned. Then it was cropped, rotated, balanced, contrasted, saturated, despeckled, noise-reductioned, and some manually touched up. This was followed by OCR scanning, manual proofreading, and translating into English.

This book is in the public domain in the United States (because it was published before 1925), but it is not public domain in Europe (because its author died in 1972). But the Masereel Group is based in the United States, so everything within here is released under the Public Domain, and all content that is not allowed to be licensed under the Public Domain is released under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 3.0 License.

UprisingEngineer, Masereel Group,
August 30, 2020

Chronology :

September 04, 2020 : The Idea -- Added to https://www.MasereelGroup.com.
September 04, 2020 : The Idea -- Last Updated on https://www.MasereelGroup.com.

HTML file generated from :

http://www.MasereelGroup.com/